Couponing for the Rest of Us

How to Make Perfect Hard-Boiled Deviled Eggs (The Devil’s in the Details!)

hard-boiled-eggs

How to Make Perfect Hard-Boiled & Deviled Eggs


Everyone has their traditional Easter foods and deviled eggs seems to be high on the list.  Most of us carnivores do a ham – most of us Southern carnivores do a ham cooked in Coke - and we usually have an array of green beans (or green bean casseroles), mashed potatoes, & rolls as sides.  That’s sort of the basics, right?

.

But everyone has that one dish that they’ll say “It’s not Easter without ….”  What’s yours?

Mine is cheesecake.  My nanny made it every Easter up until she passed away a couple years back – and it was about the only time of year I ever had cheesecake.  It was special and delicious with a graham cracker crust and grandma-love in every bite.  (Mmmm)  She also made special macaroni and cheese in the oven with cracker crumbs on top and iced tea that would make you want to never leave her porch swing as long as there were refills.  I miss Easter at Nanny’s!

I loathe deviled eggs.  This looks like I’m happy, but I’m pretending.

 

My husband’s Easter dish is deviled eggs.  I think they are evil and grody and as far as celebrations go, they should’ve even be invited to the party.  Here’s why:

.
A) They have the word devil in them  (Obviously evil)
B) They are hard boiled eggs – which smell terrible and feel weird and slippery.
C) They contain mayonnaise, mustard, and relish – three condiments I won’t go near.

I know I’m probably the minority here – but I just needed to say my piece before we jump into the helpful part of this article. (Did I mention it smells like toots?)  Okay I’ve had my say!  Now for those of you who are forced against your will to make these on Easter for your sweet husbands anyway (ahem – see above picture) – I wanted to share a couple secrets about the actual egg cooking that helped me tremendously after a couple not-so-great attempts:

How to Hard-Boil an Egg Perfectly:

    1. Buy your eggs a few, 4, 5,6 days in advance, the older they are – the easier to peel!
    2. Put your eggs in a single layer in a pot of cold water, fill to 2 inches above egg level.
    3. Add 1 TBS Baking Soda
      - This will make your egg MUCH easier to peel at the end!
    4. Turn burner on med-high until boiling gently, then REMOVE the pot from the heat and cover for 10-15 minutes.
      - This bringing to a boil slowly is what prevents eggs from cracking!
    5. Move eggs into a bowl of ice water and once completely cool, set back in their carton in the fridge.
      - Icewater prevents your yolks from turning that greenish color!
    6. Eat within 5 days.

My eggs with filling piped in (uggggghh…)

Basic Deviled Egg Recipe :
(via Paula Deen or similar but much more entertaining recipe by Christy at SouthernPlate)

  • 7 large eggs, hard boiled and peeled
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish
  • 1 teaspoon prepared mustard
  • Salt and pepper, for taste
  • Paprika, for garnishing

Halve eggs lengthwise. Remove yolks gently with a spoon and place in a bowl.  Mash yolks with a fork and stir in mayo, relish, and mustard. Add salt and pepper, to taste.

Use an icing piping bag (or just a ziploc bag with a hole cut in it) to fill egg whites evenly with yolk mixture. Garnish with paprika, gherkin pickles and pimentos. Store covered in refrigerator.

Here’s another AWESOME tip on how to get your egg out of the shell easily – BLOW it out!  If you try this, please tell me – I want to know how it goes!!

 

YOUR TURN!

Alright ladies (and gents) how do you make YOUR deviled eggs?   If that dish just isn’t your thing, then stand up with me and let your voice be heard!  What is your Easter dish?

 

 


Comments

  1. I feel the same way…Nasty are those deviled eggs, and with the exception of the preparation for family & friends, I won’t go near them. When I have the ingredient, I use a Spinach & Herb dip mix, a tablespoon or two, depending on how many eggs are being done, and the crowd goes wild.
    As for Easter staples, there are those cheesy potatoes (aka funeral potatoes) we’ve been making for seceral years. The small cubed ones with velveeta, butter, sour cream, minced onion and cream of chicken soup. Family & friends go crazy gor those too. I’ll be adding to my site once I get it going.
    Thanks for sharing, my eggs are coming to a boil now, I’ve used other methods (adding things to the water part anyway), but couldn’t remember what, and found your link in the process of searching. Too cute. Have a grateful day ~

  2. Hello, i feel that i noticed you visited my site so i came to return the want?.I’m trying to to find things to improve my site!I guess its good enough to make use of some of your ideas!!

  3. Rita Webber says:

Speak Your Mind

*